1. Imagine this:
    Instead of waiting in her tower, Rapunzel slices off her long, golden hair with a carving knife, and then uses it to climb down to freedom.
    Just as she’s about to take the poison apple, Snow White sees the familiar wicked glow in the old lady’s eyes, and slashes the evil queen’s throat with a pair of sewing scissors.
    Cinderella refuses everything but the glass slippers from her fairy godmother, crushes her stepmother’s windpipe under her heel, and the Prince falls madly in love with the mysterious girl who dons rags and blood-stained slippers.

    Imagine this:
    Persephone goes adventuring with weapons hidden under her dress.
    Persephone climbs into the gaping chasm.
    Or, Persephone uses her hands to carve a hole down to hell.
    In none of these versions is Persephone’s body violated unless she asks Hades to hold her down with his horse-whips.
    Not once does she hold out on eating the pomegranate, instead biting into it eagerly and relishing the juice running down her chin, staining it red.
    In some of the stories, Hades never appears and Persephone rules the underworld with a crown of her own making.
    In all of them, it is widely known that the name Persephone means Bringer of Destruction.

    Imagine this:
    Red Riding Hood marches from her grandmother’s house with a bloody wolf pelt.
    Medusa rights the wrongs that have been done to her.
    Eurydice breaks every muscle in her arms climbing out of the land of the dead.

    Imagine this:
    Girls are allowed to think dark thoughts, and be dark things.

    Imagine this:
    Instead of the dragon, it’s the princess with claws and fiery breath
    who smashes her way from the confines of her castle
    and swallows men whole.

    — 

    'Reinventing Rescuing,' theappleppielifestyle. (via justawordshaker)

    Give me all of them. 

    (via fandomsandfeminism)

    (Source: theappleppielifestyle)

  2. Anger is understandable of course, and everyone is entitled to their feelings, but no one, for any reason, is entitled to use their feelings as a justification to hurt others. This is not the same as using those feelings to attack structures of oppression and I don’t believe there’s anyone who can’t tell the difference. Surely I will be accused of making excuses to protect oppressors: so like, obvs I don’t care about those jerks. I would say be as unreasonably, cruelly mean to them as you possibly can and I wouldn’t shed even a tear.

    Except, I guess what I’ve seen in the last year is that no one in the world can be trusted in even the slightest capacity to use that cruelty responsibly, can they? It’s a contest to see who can best appropriate the language of social justice to legitimize their status as victim and their rival’s as oppressor. Suddenly, the other imperceptibly more privileged queer person is as deserving of cruelty as the sickest oppressor and the shift will happen so fast you’re drawn and quartered by both ends of your community before you can blink because two people can’t get along and they don’t know how to resolve arguments without turning the vast machinery of social justice onto each other as if marginalized individuals were as logical a target for this rhetoric as the vast hegemonies they were invented to dismantle.

    — Mammon Machine: Top Two Things I Learned 2013 

  3. ash-panic:

    Today is the one year anniversary of when I started working at Kotaku full time. It almost slipped my mind, but I promised myself I’d write something about this year on this date.

    Read More

  4. cauda-pavonis:

hugtherobots:

I know it’s trendy to fight the system and cry that we are all becoming slaves of technology, but this attitude overlooks that computers and phones are tools for communicating. When someone thinks I’m an idiot smiling at a machine, I’m actually smiling at my girlfriend who is 10000 miles away and whom I would have never met if not for these newfangled electronics. As they say: when the wise man points to the moon, the fool looks at the finger.
This is a topic that I’ve been wanting to tackle for a while now; much credit to this excellent post for bringing it to the front of my brain.

commentary

    cauda-pavonis:

    hugtherobots:

    I know it’s trendy to fight the system and cry that we are all becoming slaves of technology, but this attitude overlooks that computers and phones are tools for communicating. When someone thinks I’m an idiot smiling at a machine, I’m actually smiling at my girlfriend who is 10000 miles away and whom I would have never met if not for these newfangled electronics. As they say: when the wise man points to the moon, the fool looks at the finger.

    This is a topic that I’ve been wanting to tackle for a while now; much credit to this excellent post for bringing it to the front of my brain.

    commentary

  5. cauda-pavonis:

    alantyson:

    Actually really good career advice from a laughing homicidal madman.

    Old Economy Joker. :/

    (Source: heathledgers)

  6. Last evening in Cairns.

    Last evening in Cairns.

  7. Pretty much anything about the ongoing standoff with Indonesia over 63 asylum seekers.

    thingsthecoalitionwonttellyou:

    "The federal government has refused to answer the most basic questions about asylum seekers, amid a stand-off with Indonesia about the fate of 63 rescued boat people."

    SMH

  8. ‘You Can Sleep Here All Night’: Video Games and Labor | Jacobin →

    brendansharedalink:

    Scathing dismantling of every aspect of the games industry.

  9. sutured-infection:

    Cellulose nitrate was used to make dice from the late 1860s until the middle of the twentieth century, and the material remains stable for decades. Then, in a flash, they can dramatically decompose. Nitric acid is released in a process called outgassing. The dice cleave, crumble, and then implode.

    From Dice: Deception, Fate & Rotten Luck by Ricky Jay and Rosamond Purcell, 2002.

  10. Mammon Machine: The Implications of Gone Home →

    mammon-machine:

    Here’s a thought I hope is frighteningly cynical: as Gone Home and imitators become popular and consumable outside of a subculture trained to play them, as it becomes taken more and more seriously, a new set of formalists eager to depict the ennui of aging men will fill the void currently occupied by the formalists. They will be considered the first people to truly unlock the artistic potential of the medium, unlike the clumsy and haphazard art of the queer folx that paved their way.